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What to expect from the 11th annual Governors Ball Music Festival

(06/08/22 12:00pm)

The Governors Ball Music Festival returns to New York City for its 11th year this weekend, showcasing over 60 artists across three stages and a multitude of genres. The festival will once again be hosted at Citi Field in Queens, following the success of the new location during the 10th anniversary Gov Ball last fall. This marks the third location change for the festival, which was originally held on Governors Island before an eight-year run on Randall’s Island due to the festival’s growth.


19 for 19

(03/14/22 1:00pm)

As long as I’ve known her, my friend Rachel has made a playlist for her birthday every year. The concept is simple: the length is determined by the age she’s turning (so, 19 songs for her nineteenth birthday) and the songs are meant to represent her prior year, to sum up the person she was at that age. I’ve always loved the idea that, simply by pressing ‘play’, you’re instantly brought back to the feelings and unique experiences of those twelve months. 


Cucciolo Osteria: A must-try for Durham residents and Duke students alike

(02/07/22 5:00pm)

A short walk from East Campus, straight down West Main Street, lies Cucciolo Osteria, an upscale, yet friendly restaurant, offering “modern Italian Cuisine with a twist.” Brought to Durham by cousins Jimmy (a Duke alum!) and Julian Kim, Cucciolo Osteria is the sister restaurant to their inaugural location in Seoul, South Korea. Best known for their rotating selection of pasta dishes and their curated wine and cocktail offerings, they’ve made a solid impact on the Durham restaurant scene since opening in 2018. 


15 movies to add to your watchlist this year

(02/07/22 1:00pm)

I finally did it. After much deliberation, I’m now the proud owner of a Letterboxd account with three (3!!!) whole followers. In my quest to officially become a cinephile in 2022, I’ve compiled a list of upcoming movies that might be solid potential additions to your watchlist. From glitzy biopics to psychological thrillers, there’s something for everyone this upcoming year. 



Licensed to kiln: Why DukeCreate's pottery workshops garner hundreds of students' interest

(10/25/21 4:00am)

Looking for something to do on a Monday night? Thanks to a partnership between DukeCreate and DuWell, you can now learn the basics of pottery — if you can make it past the workshop’s waitlist. "Throwing on the Wheel" is a workshop that provides an introduction to wheel pottery and throwing techniques. It is also one of the most popular DukeCreate courses, regularly having waitlists of 100+ for a 12-person session. 


'TORN: A Year that Changed Everything' showcases Margaret Sartor’s emotional reflections from a year of turmoil

(10/08/21 4:00am)

When you think back to your time in quarantine, what comes to mind? For many, including Margaret Sartor, the artist behind “TORN: A Year that Changed Everything,” it was marked by constant anxiety about the events around us and uncertainty about the future. Throughout her daily peruse of the newspaper, Sartor began to annotate the articles and photos, expressing her “frustration… and shock” and imbuing the pages with her emotional reactions. Sartor described this practice as “giving voice to [her] interior battles,” and the resulting pages combined events and emotion, capturing the near universal mindsets of  quarantine. 


Lorde’s Māori-language EP, ‘Te Ao Mārama,’ is for Everyone

(09/20/21 4:00am)

Fresh off the release of her third studio album, “Solar Power,” Lorde surprised fans by dropping a surprise EP, “Te Ao Mārama” Sept. 9. The EP features five songs from “Solar Power” recorded entirely in te reo Māori, the indigenous language of the Māori people of New Zealand. Though the singer does not speak te reo Māori, in a statement, she said that she created this version to honor the theme of “caring for and listening to the natural world” prevalent in “Solar Power.” Lorde, who is not Māori, credits the Māori culture for creating the spiritual and nature-focused “worldview” that all New Zealanders grow up with.