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The House on Burch

(07/01/13 6:17pm)

Not far from the Duke Arts Annex, on Burch Avenue, there is a house that is so covered in sculptures, it’s practically a museum. The pieces are made of wood, metal gears, old prescription bottles and the odd View-Master—a camera-like toy that displays images through the viewfinder. The house’s wrap-around porch doubles as an outdoor studio. Stacked next to a workbench are drawers filled with nuts and bolts and buckets overflowing with scraps of old wood and miscellaneous junk—an old xylophone, a small television. Behind the work area, a stained glass window hangs from the roof.


The Next Chapter

(02/27/13 6:57am)

On a winter night in Raleigh, a man wearing khakis, a red sweater vest, a tweed jacket and a tan cap steps up to the pulpit. “Brothers and sisters,” he addresses his congregation, “in the beginning was the word.” He pauses, the crowd hanging onto his every word . He continues: “And the word was with God, and the word was God.” His audience sits on plastic white chairs and wooden benches. The speaker is Allan Gurganus, one of several writers who have come to “testify” on behalf of the Quail Ridge Books and Music store for its 28th anniversary celebration.


Think Small

(09/28/12 3:24am)

The clatter of plates, customers placing their orders, babbling babies and jazz music. These are not the typical sounds one associates with an office environment, perhaps with the exception of entrepreneurs, who are known for their flexibility. One such entrepreneur, Krista Anne Nordgren, runs her business out of a 30 sq.-ft. space in the front window of Beyu Caffe in downtown Durham.









Stone

(11/04/10 8:00am)

Edward Norton looks good in cornrows, but beyond the hairstyle there lies a burning house and a tale of guilty consciences. With three main characters, as many settings and a bare-bones plot, Stone has all the makings of a cerebral film—one driven almost entirely by character and theme.