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Library director of development named

Thomas B. Hadzor has been appointed director of development for the Duke University Libraries, effective Jan. 3, 2006.

As a member of the library's senior management team, Hadzor will lead all the library's advancement efforts, which include fund raising for the continuation of the Perkins Library renovation and expansion project.

The first milestone of the project was the completion of the Bostock Library and the von der Heyden Pavilion, both of which were dedicated Nov. 11.

Since 2003 Hadzor has been associate dean for alumni and development at the Duke School of Law, where he oversaw the conclusion of a successful $67 million comprehensive campaign and led a building campaign with a goal of $15 million.

Hadzor served from 1996-2003 as associate director and executive director of development and communications for the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center. During the Campaign for Duke, he led the cancer center's fundraising of $110 million and more than doubled the number of annual gifts.

 

New online grading tool in place

Duke has launched "Online Grading," a web-based tool that allows faculty to submit students' grades with an online form.

"There seems to be a lot of enthusiasm about online grading," said Katharine Pfeiffer, assistant vice provost and director of Student Information Services and Systems.

With the new Online Grading interface, faculty members are able to add midterm or final grades to the system and submit them to the registrar online.

The system also provides a way for faculty to upload grades and permits a partial list of grades for a class to be to be submitted, a convenient function for submitting midterm grades and spring semester grades for graduating students. Previous to the implementation of Online Grading, all faculty members were required to manually submit a paper grade sheet to the registrar.

 

Clinic set up for low-income taxpayers

Low-income taxpayers in the Triangle who find themselves in disputes with the Internal Revenue Service can receive legal help at Duke Law School.

The newly established Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic involves law students, under faculty supervision, representing clients in tax matters pending before the IRS, including collection actions, audits, administrative appeals and representation in the United States Tax Court. A grant from the IRS helped launch the clinic, which is currently accepting cases and will welcome its inaugural staff of students in January 2006.

Lecturing Fellow Alan Weinberg, who has almost 40 years of tax law experience, including 29 with the IRS, will direct the clinic. From 1981 until 1995, he was the district counsel for the IRS in Greensboro, after which he spent 10 years handling tax actions for Ernst & Young LLP.

"Nobody should go to an IRS audit without representation," Weinberg said. "We will be giving our students the skill-set to effectively represent clients before the Service, which starts with an effective client interview, gathering all the facts and documentation and performing thorough research of the law."

 

Pratt professor wins Washington Award

Henry Petroski, a professor of civil engineering, has been selected to receive the 2006 Washington Award. The award is conferred annually upon an engineer "whose professional attainments have preeminently advanced the welfare of human kind," according to the web site of the Western Society of Engineers, which administers the award.

Among Petroski's accomplishments that the award commission considered in choosing to recognize him were his "research and writings on the human aspects of engineering" and his "worldwide reputation on the history of engineering, intention and manufacturing."

The Washington Award is among the nation's oldest and most prestigious engineering awards. Its first recipient was Herbert Hoover. Subsequent recipients have included Orville Wright, Henry Ford, Hyman Rickover, David Packard, and Neil Armstrong.

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