The independent news organization of Duke University

Recess | Culture

RECESS  |  CULTURE

Why don't we care more about the Pastry World Cup?

Perhaps the deeper cause for our shared neglect of the Cup is a lack of appreciation for food as a demonstration of craftsmanship and creativity, of which the increasingly fast-paced industrial lifestyle is a major culprit. Too often we value food for its ability to enhance our productivity rather than for its own virtue. Thus, the advertising slogan for Saladelia outside Perkins Library: “Yum on the run.” You can often see students skipping multiple meals but never their coffee.


CULTURE  |  TV

‘Survivor’ Season 41 debut: Too new or a rejuvenated classic?

Entertainment Weekly calls it “the granddaddy of reality TV.” My family calls it “the only show we can all agree to watch together.” Regardless of what you call it, “Survivor” is back, and Wednesday nights are normal again after sixteen long months. And as for the show being “back and better than ever,” I cannot bring myself to admit that just yet.


CULTURE  |  MUSIC

Lessons about art from Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time

Perhaps the only list where Robyn’s “Dancing on my Own” and John Lennon’s “Imagine” will ever be ranked side by side, specifically at number 20 and number 19, it includes a variety of genres and representation from every decade since the 1930s. While many of the songs are instantly recognizable, whether they be pop favorites or timeless ballads, it wouldn’t be the “500 Greatest Songs of All Time” without controversy and the plague of rockism. 


CULTURE  |  TV

I overanalyzed 'Sex Education' so you don't have to

The third season of Netflix’s “Sex Education” opens in a way you’d expect from the title: a lot of people having sex. This rather graphic opener sets the tone for a season about sex positivity with some characteristically raunchy humor that leaves audiences pleasantly surprised by the tumultuous season to come.


RECESS  |  CULTURE

SHEIN is She-Out: It’s time to question our consumption

Tops from Forever 21, pants from Shein, dresses from H&M, skirts from Zara, jackets from Amazon, accessories from Uniqlo — at a university where 69% of students come from families at the top 20% of incomes and students claim to be environmentally conscious, why do cheap, unethically made clothing items have such a strong presence among our student body?