The independent news organization of Duke University

Search Results


Use the fields below to perform an advanced search of The Chronicle's archives. This will return articles, images, and multimedia relevant to your query. You can also try a Basic search




3 items found for your search. If no results were found please broaden your search.



Government on campus: Then and now

(12/07/20 5:00am)

Since this past summer, historically white universities throughout the nation have sought to reckon with their long history of anti-Black racism. At Duke, president Vincent Price committed to taking “transformative action now toward eliminating the systems of racism and inequality that have shaped the lived experiences of too many members of the Duke community.” Likewise, at Princeton, President Christopher Eisgruber acknowledged that “racist assumptions from the past . . . remain embedded in structures of the university itself.”


Who pays for racial equity?

(07/24/20 4:00am)

On June 17, 2020, Duke president Vincent Price committed the university to taking “transformative action now toward eliminating the systems of racism and inequality that have shaped the lived experiences of too many members of the Duke community.” He acknowledged that in the past Duke had “often not fully embraced” its mission “to be agents of progress in advancing racial equity and justice.” Now, he said, it was time for the university to take a series of bold and specific actions that would “resolutely turn [Duke’s] attention toward the mission of anti-racism.” Although addressing issues that had confronted the university since the Sixties, Price’s words conveyed a new urgency and intent.


The more things change...

(07/08/20 4:00am)

On June 16, 2020. Duke’s Black students, faculty and staff spoke out about racism at the university during an all-day event called “Living While Black.” Held by videoconference, more than 6300 members of the Duke community attended. Soon thereafter, Duke president Vincent Price committed the university to taking “transformative action now toward eliminating the systems of racism and inequality that have shaped the lived experiences of too many members of the Duke community.” He acknowledged that Duke had “often not fully embraced” its mission “to be agents of progress in advancing racial equity and justice.” Price outlined a series of bold and specific actions that would “resolutely turn [Duke’s] attention toward the mission of anti-racism." Although addressing issues that had confronted the university since the Sixties, Price’s words conveyed new urgency in both tone and substance.