The independent news organization of Duke University

Search Results


Use the fields below to perform an advanced search of The Chronicle's archives. This will return articles, images, and multimedia relevant to your query. You can also try a Basic search




61 items found for your search. If no results were found please broaden your search.



Music Review: Hilary Duff

(04/12/07 4:00am)

Hilary Duff's third album, Dignity, begins to reveal that at least some substance might remain in the human who was once Lizzie McGuire. Duff has moved away from the tween-pop of her past, leaving behind peers like Natasha Bedingfield, Ashlee Simpson and the even-more-soulless Kelly Clarkson, embedding herself fully in the electro-pop genre. And the result is not as horrific as one might expect.



Music Review: RJD2

(03/08/07 5:00am)

Many words can be used to describe Rjd2's third studio album, The Third Hand, but the one that comes to mind the most often is disappointing. The album finds Rjd2, an accomplished hip-hop producer, completely abandoning his hip-hop foundations. Sampled beats and hot guest rhymes are traded for synths and Rjd2's own singing voice.


Music Review: Kittie

(03/01/07 5:00am)

All-girl nu-metal group Kittie's latest album, Funeral for Yesterday, is a pathetic mess. Lead singer Morgan Lander (think a goth version of Courtney Love who was called fat one too many times as a kid) sounds like she lifted her lyrics directly from a depressed eighth grader's book of poetry. Spitting such pseudo-philosophical lyrics as "When you don't know yourself/ It's time to get out of here," and the insightful "Summer dies/ Winter takes its place," Lander screeches and wails atonally over thrashing detuned guitars and pounding double kick drums.


Music Review: The Nein

(02/15/07 5:00am)

Durham-based group the Nein's sophomore album, Luxury, both excites and disappoints. Taking their post-punk influences to the logical next step, Luxury's sound is more cohesive than their 2005 debut album Wrath of Circuits. But despite the cohesion, Luxury lacks the hard-hitting desperation apparent in Wrath of Circuits-much of the urgent distorted bass and snare drum ubiquitous in Wrath is replaced by a quieter nebula of noise on the new disc. Despite this, there are many points in Luxury where the Nein shines-namely, in the melody-driven "Decollage" and "Burn Construction," and the group's most obvious maturation in the radio-friendly "Get Up."






Music Review: Kevin Federline

(11/02/06 5:00am)

Just as we look back with awe and fascination at ancient pyramids, those of the future will be enthralled when they experience Playing With Fire, Kevin Federline's diamond-quality debut album. A gifted lyricist, Federline delivers, with clarity and passion, lines such as "Hand your ass to you in a basket wrapped in plastic" and "I'm loony, all these model chicks wanna do me." The man is, without a doubt, the crown jewel of our modern age.


Troika: Mountain Goats

(10/19/06 4:00am)

If you can only see one band at Troika, make it the Mountain Goats. Arguably the most popular band to play at the festival, the Mountain Goats-a moniker of singer-songwriter John Darnielle-have been selling records nationally since 1995, and they've amassed a huge cult following over the years. Regarded as one of the founders of the lo-fi genre, Darnielle is signed to legendary indie label 4AD (home of artists such as M. Ward and Blonde Redhead) and was hailed last year by the New Yorker as one of the best lyricists of our time. And a couple of years ago, Darnielle moved from California to Durham. In an interview with recess last year, he cited "the nearness to the ocean, the weather and the widespread availability of boiled peanuts" as his reasons for moving. The Mountain Goats are a huge first step toward pushing Durham's music scene into any sort of significance, and they will no doubt put on one incredible show.






Incarcerated counterculture: The black metal resurgence

(06/15/06 4:00am)

Editor's note: On these pages, we often discuss the power of art to promote peace, love and tolerance. We forget sometimes that art can have every bit as much power to promote divisive themes as it does to bring people together. So what happens when the line blurs between art and politics-especially when those politics are contentious? We've decided to explore this question in a three-part series about controversial musicians emerging on the national scene. This article is the final article in the series.


DAM raps on Palestinian nation

(06/15/06 4:00am)

Editor's note: On these pages, we often discuss the power of art to promote peace, love and tolerance. We forget sometimes that art can have every bit as much power to promote divisive themes as it does to bring people together. So what happens when the line blurs between art and politics-especially when those politics are contentious? We've decided to explore this question in a three-part series about controversial musicians emerging on the national scene. This article is the second in the series.


Musical duo advocates racial separation

(06/15/06 4:00am)

Editor's note: On these pages, we often discuss the power of art to promote peace, love and tolerance. We forget sometimes that art can have every bit as much power to promote divisive themes as it does to bring people together. So what happens when the line blurs between art and politics-especially when those politics are contentious? We've decided to explore this question in a three-part series about controversial musicians emerging on the national scene. This article, about a teen singing duo that promotes White Nationalism, is the first in the series.



Enya

(12/01/05 5:00am)

Don't expect anything new from Enya in her new album, Amarantine. But for the queen of pop-laced new wave music, the lack of change is not necessarily a bad thing. And Amarantine combines just that type of music-a combination of songs with no coherent melody, breathy vocals, random strings and beautiful songs along the same vein as "Only Time," the song that made her famous.