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‘Stag at Sharkey’s’ celebrates the beauty of the human form

(02/01/20 6:49pm)

Anyone who knows me knows that I bear what some might describe as an alarming allegiance to Cleveland, Ohio, the city I call home. In fact, I once (somewhat jokingly) described Cleveland as the cultural capital of the world. While that assertion is questionable at best, I truly do believe it whenever I go to the Cleveland Museum of Art.



On Awkwafina, appropriation and Asian American identity

(01/23/20 5:01am)

On Jan. 5, Awkwafina became the first performer of Asian descent to win a Golden Globe award for lead actress in a motion picture. While her performance as Billi in “The Farewell” may have been the first time I have seen a character who looks like me authentically portrayed on the big screen, her win does not come without a bitter aftertaste. For many Asian Americans, myself included, her history-making recognition validates the importance of seeing ourselves represented in film. Yet we cannot ignore the fact that Awkwafina’s win also rewards a career-long exploitation of Black culture for personal gain. 



Wealth and environmental disasters are at the forefront of ‘Parasite’

(11/02/19 4:02am)

If the Palme d’Or and 99% Rotten Tomatoes rating didn't tip you off already, Bong Joon-ho’s “Parasite” is a masterpiece. At once hilarious, thrilling and heartbreaking, “Parasite” packs intricate social commentary about class division and wealth inequality into 2 hours and 11 minutes of brilliance.


'Fairview' and tackling the white gaze

(10/17/19 6:54pm)

When I walked into Theater for a New Audience at Polonsky Shakespeare Center this past summer, I couldn’t help but wonder what “new audience” it was referring to. As I sat down, I counted myself as one of a small handful of people of color in the theater’s 299 seats. I was disappointed, but the whiteness of most theatrical spaces no longer surprises me.