There is a certain finesse that I believe comes with writing, a finesse that I don’t believe I possess.

That being said, one could read this column twenty times over (which I don’t recommend) and get a rough estimate of how long it took me to draft the first sentence. Finding the right words to match what I want to say is like finding something new to eat on this campus. I prefer to tell my stories with the fleeting notes of music or, with a thousand words, or however many words are said to be found in a photograph.

But the latter part was very new to me. I remember when my parents bought me my first DSLR camera. Not knowing anything about photography aside from the occasional iPhone selfie, I opened the box and was very confused. My first, second, and third thoughts were “how would this ever fit in my clutch for prom?” Then, my parents started suggesting that I should take a summer class in photography, emphasis on the word summer, because at the ripe age of 17, I couldn’t imagine taking a class in the summer. There were so many other things to do during the summer in the great state of Ohio. Flash forward to my current self, while I do not condone my naïve thinking when I was younger for I enjoyed going to the pool every day that summer, I do wish I had begun photography a lot earlier. But better late than never they also say, right?

After taking my first-year seminar in photography, I realized it was something that I wanted to continue throughout my studies at Duke, which is why I decided to add the Certificate for Documentary Studies. I also began looking for more opportunities to get involved on campus, and stumbled upon The Chronicle. As a timid freshman with little knowledge of how to work a camera, I really was not sure what to expect, but that first semester working with The Chronicle, I had begun to understand and really appreciate the realm of photojournalism.

Being involved in the photo department of The Chronicle has brought me many opportunities that I can’t imagine I would have had otherwise. In a sense, I feel a deeper connection with the campus having the ability to say “I was there” when the story comes out. This is why I encourage those who are interested in capturing all the various events, sports, and speakers on campus to check it out. It is really a great opportunity for students with any level or interest in photography and who are looking for a way to get involved in campus life.

In my short two years, I have had the pleasure of meeting two ambassadors, covering countless sports games and tournaments, and documenting the various news on campus. I have also been able to grow as a photographer and connect with a lot of great students and faculty on campus. I look forward to meeting any and every student looking to get involved with the photo department. And if you are interested or want to know more about the photo department, feel free to send me an email or talk to me on campus, I’ll be the one holding a camera.

Darbi Griffith is the photo editor of The Chronicle V. 110.