At its February meeting, the Board of Trustees voted to raise undergraduate tuition for the 2018-19 academic year to $53,760, which is a 3.9 percent increase.

Accounting for room, board and other fees, the total price of a Duke education next year will be $70,873. According to a Duke Today release, the percentage increase of cost of attendance is low compared to past annual percentage increases. Last year's tuition increase was 4.3 percent, so this year's cost of attendance is $68,298.

"This would mark the lowest increase in about 10 years and follows an exhaustive analysis of having the resources required to do what we do as well of the provision of financial aid for students," said President Vincent Price.

The Duke Today release also noted that "financial aid is expected to grow at a rate greater than the rise in tuition for the coming year."

Tuition rates for Duke's graduate and professional schools in 2018-19 were also decided and can be viewed below:

  • Divinity School: $24,180 (Master of Divinity), an increase of four percent from this year.
  • Fuqua School of Business: $68,200 (daytime MBA), up 3.9 percent.
  • Graduate School: $53,540 (Ph.D. programs), up four percent.
  • Law School: $63,400, up 3.9 percent.
  • Nicholas School of the Environment: $39,975, up 2.5 percent.
  • Pratt School of Engineering: $54,576 (Master of Engineering Management Program), up four percent.
  • Sanford School of Public Policy: $46,900 (Master of Public Policy), up three percent.
  • School of Medicine: $59,100, up 3.5 percent.
  • School of Nursing: $42,456, up 3.9 percent.

Price indicated that the Board also discussed some possible internal changes to its structure and thinking.

“It’s being baked now,” said Chair of the Board Jack Bovender. “We’ll have it fully baked by the May Board meeting, so there will be more information to share with you about how we’re changing some things to create more time to do a lot of strategic thinking about what we’re going to do over the next five or ten years, now that we’ve got a new president and his work on what our priorities ought to be in this age of big changes to higher education."

Check back for updates on this developing story.